From city streets to Death Valley dunes, the fine art photography of Eric Renard covers a lot of ground. Lately, he has focused on capturing the City of Angels, where he currently lives, with an eye on poking fun at the ’80s tune “Walking in L.A.”

Stroll, Saunter, Strut

If you know the song by Missing Persons, you’ll remember this verse: "Nobody walks in L.A." Eric’s work by the same name shows us that, despite the car culture, Angelenos do move about the city on foot.

“This black-and-white project focuses on high-contrast urban cityscapes that reflect an eerie sense of peace and tranquility,” Eric explains. For example, in “Circles & Stripes,” showcased above, sweeping architectural details tower above a lone man, conveying the motion of a journey on pause. In “Urbanity,” below, long shadows line the interior of a building in downtown L.A. while a man’s silhouette brings scale and life to the image.

Enter Frame Destination 

For his “Nobody Walks in L.A.” exhibits at the Sasse Museum of Art in Pomona, California, and TAG Gallery in Los Angeles, Eric framed his work in our Black Wood Photo Frame 852 with matte finish. This contemporary gallery-style frame complements a range of art and photos without overpowering the display. Eric also appreciates the quality of our frame construction, the vast selection, and our customer service. 

"Urbanity" by Eric Renard
“Urbanity” by Eric Renard.

See More of Eric’s Work

Discover an array of black-and-white, color, and “splash” photography at EricRenardPhotography.com. Eric’s Instagram feed captures the character of urban environments and natural spaces, primarily in black-and-white. To find out which high school teacher’s advice he follows to combat creative blocks — spoiler alert: it’s not an art teacher — read my Q&A with Eric below. 

Eric Renard poses with his artwork

Now for Arties Eight Q&A with Eric Renard…

1. What is your background; how did you get started?

My photographic journey began almost 50 years ago, documenting what I saw: my friends, family, and neighborhood. However, I didn’t embrace photography as a creative art form until many years later. I still find myself exploring with camera in hand, documenting my surroundings — the people, the light, and the shadows.

2. How important is it for a photographer to "connect" with their subject?

I love what I do, but I think it’s more important for the viewer to connect with the subject than me.

3. What has been a formative experience or the best advice you’ve received within your career?

Very simple. As French artist and photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson said, “Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.” In other words, keep shooting.

4. In what ways does your work reflect your personality?

We are polar opposites. My work is meticulous; I am not. My work is black and white; I am grey. My work is solitary with few people; I am usually in a crowd. 

5. Creative blocks, do you get them? If so, how do you overcome them?

Yes. I take the advice of my high school gym class coach: "Walk it off." 🙂

6. What is your most indispensable tool? (Not counting the obvious, like paints, brushes, canvas, camera, etc.)

Walking shoes, my Mac, and a big monitor.

7. Do you have a new project you are working on, or a new passionate idea?

In 1982, the song “Walking in L.A.,” by the new wave band Missing Persons, poked fun at Los Angeles for its dependence on cars — “Nobody walks in L.A.” Forty years later, the world may still think we don't walk much, but we do. We also saunter, stroll, and strut our stuff on bikes and scooters. This black-and-white project focuses on high-contrast urban cityscapes that reflect an eerie sense of peace and tranquility. Wrapped in our daily cocoon of routine, we obliviously move past cityscapes painted by light and shadows. In this series of images, we explore L.A.’s unique architecture — some of it is loved, some is hated, and some is completely unnoticed.

8. What "fad" gadget do you most regret purchasing?

Hmmm. Probably a mini tripod, which isn’t any more stable than hand held.

All artwork and/or photographs used in this post are subject to copyright held by the featured artist.

ARE YOU READY FOR THE SPOTLIGHT? Simply respond to the questionnaire here to apply to be included in an upcoming Artie’s Eight Spotlight.

Last Updated April 9, 2024

From city streets to Death Valley dunes, the fine art photography of Eric Renard covers a lot of ground. Lately, he has focused on capturing the City of Angels, where he currently lives, with an eye on poking fun at the ’80s tune “Walking in L.A.” Stroll, Saunter, Strut If you know the song by […]

Many people would prefer to forget their cancer experience, especially one that includes misdiagnoses, chemotherapy, radiation, and a terminal prognosis. But visual artist David Brady records — and redeems — his experience via sketchbook, imagination, and a ballpoint pen. 

“In the Pain Cave”

While going through stage 3 throat cancer, David chronicled his journey via hundreds of drawings and paintings. He used his sketchbooks to create the series “Into the Tunnel,” layering his artwork with such items as medical records and prescriptions. Because David believes art is a healing experience, he infuses this somber topic with threads of resilience, hope, and even humor.

Today, fully recovered and living near the mountains in Phoenix, Arizona, David is still using his art to bring attention to difficult subjects like the mental health crisis, creating psychological portraits of what he observes and feels as he explores the figure through collage, assemblage, oil, and drawing. 

Enter Frame Destination

The pen-on-paper piece featured above, titled “Nervous,” is part of the “Into the Tunnel” collection and is showcased in a black Nielson P-117 frame by Frame Destination. “Little Hero” below is a new work. David framed this oil, pen, and collage on canvas in our metallic bronze Canvas Floater Frame F342, featuring a slight inward slope that draws the eye directly into this powerful piece.

David holding one of his framed pieces, "Little Hero"
"Little Hero” displayed in Canvas Floater Frame F342.   

See More of David’s Work

David’s website, BradyArt.com, showcases his collections, new works, and publications, including a published graphic memoir of his cancer experience. Tune into his YouTube channel for interviews and insights into his painting techniques. David’s company Brady Book Design helps turn people’s passions, adventures, and causes into personal publications. To discover his latest form of expression, read the Q&A below. 

Now for Artie’s Eight Q&A with David Brady …

1. What is your background; how did you get started?

When I was in 2nd or 3rd grade, my mom sent me to another school every Friday so I could attend their art classes. She said I was better than the public school teacher and was bored to death. After leaving home as a teenager, I discovered the power of a sketchbook; over 90 sketchbooks later, they have become the center of my figurative universe. Although I took art figure drawing classes in college, I never felt connected to anything going on and abandoned it all altogether until I was nearly 30. It took me leaving my corporate job and leaning on my tiny savings to go at it full-time. Like most artists, it was about balancing making money and the time commitment required to do good work. Today, at 60, I am deeply rooted in my daily creative practice and am grateful to have never given up.

2. What role do you think the artist plays in society?

Art, like music, not only can inspire others to pursue meaningful truths but also educate society in new ways. The first day I encountered the power of the internet (1992), I immediately thought, "Wow, artists can now not only present their work in their own voice, but they can also communicate with other artists all over the world; I wonder if we will see this opportunity.” When I saw Francis Bacon's "Pope Innocent X," I realized for the first time that artists could make art about things they were upset or bothered by. Art could be used to talk about wrongs, inform the culture of its errors, and inspire others to tell the truth. While others painted familiar, safe, and already-seen things, I became fixated on "the unseen" people we marginalized. Suddenly, bringing awareness about mental health and other issues became part of my purpose to create. Through my touring installation of 100+ psychological portraits, "The Mind Mask," and my graphic memoir, "Into the Tunnel," I have raised awareness about several subjects.

3. What has been a formative experience or the best advice you’ve received within your career?

Opportunities are created. Many of my relationships with professional creatives have yielded amazing conversations that have kept me going through the challenges of being a full-time artist. My best teaching experience was running a commercial gallery for years for a large company. I learned that whatever you do, whatever you make, be honest with intent, stick with your voice, and don't follow trends. The artist LeRoy Neiman once told me, "The art world will turn on you in a minute and label you done. Follow your own voice and create your own world." I have learned that, in the end, it's about what you have left for the world to digest, what you've added to the history of art.

4. In what ways does your work reflect your personality?

Well, I often get emails and texts asking, "Are you okay? Did something bad happen?”

People have given me business cards for shrinks and doctors and have even told me that their whole church was praying for me to stop making "that art." So, some people have associated my paintings with me personally. I wondered, "Do they think Stephen King has killed someone because of what he writes?" I often work alone, like most artists, and most of my images are solo figures. I have done bodies of work based on something that has happened to me. (My "Into the Tunnel" exhibition and publication are about surviving cancer.) The reflection is based on the viewer and their state when seeing it.

5. Creative blocks, do you get them? If so, how do you overcome them?

Creative blocks do happen, and it's part of the process. After completing a body of work for an exhibition, the following weeks in the studio are often a bit flat. I continue to use my sketchbook and return to familiar music and traditional materials that slowly crank up my mind again. Sometimes, it is best to stay away from news, social media, etc., while resting my mind and doing fun, childlike experiments in the studio. In the end, the whole point is to have fun and be happy that you are alive.

6. What is your most indispensable tool? (Not counting the obvious, like paints, brushes, canvas, camera, etc.)

Discarded ballpoint pens. You can find them on sidewalks, public places, and even banks (lol). With my sketchbook companion, these two elements are just about all one needs to record daily.

7. Do you have a new project you are working on, or a new passionate idea?

With process and materials being key in my work, I have recently moved away from line drawing and into mark making. This slight adjustment to tap the pencil on the canvas or paper rather than move lyrically has opened a whole new form on my canvas, an entirely new way to express. With about 10 drawings and a few paintings in this mark-making, I am fully focused on its possibilities and new languages.

8. What is your favorite color to incorporate into your art?

Currently, yellow. Hope is a theme in most of my work, which often portrays a sense of loss or stagnation; yellow represents hope to me.

All artwork and/or photographs used in this post are subject to copyright held by the featured artist.

ARE YOU READY FOR THE SPOTLIGHT? Simply respond to the questionnaire here to apply to be included in an upcoming Artie’s Eight Spotlight.

Last Updated March 13, 2024

Many people would prefer to forget their cancer experience, especially one that includes misdiagnoses, chemotherapy, radiation, and a terminal prognosis. But visual artist David Brady records — and redeems — his experience via sketchbook, imagination, and a ballpoint pen.  “In the Pain Cave” While going through stage 3 throat cancer, David chronicled his journey via […]

Rustic, Refined

Buffalo check? Time to uncheck. Faux distressed furniture? Let’s get real. Even if a few traditional Farmhouse Chic elements are wearing out their welcome, this warm and cozy interior design style is still on the scene in a fresh, modern way. 

Where Did Farmhouse Chic Decor Originate?

Farmhouse architecture emerged from Germany and Scandinavia. The simple, hardy construction migrated to the U.S. in the 1700s and is associated with America’s early pioneers, who often settled in unforgiving environments. Building on these hardy beginnings, Farmhouse Chic decor took flight around 2010 on the wings of Joanna Gaines — the Waco, Texas, star of HGTV’s Fixer Upper. A welcome shift from its fussier predecessor, Shabby Chic/French Country, Farmhouse Chic is similar to Modern Rustic Decor, which blends traditional farmhouse elements with graphic shapes and sleek finishes to instill a contemporary vibe.   

Who Does Farmhouse Chic Decor Appeal To?

If you appreciate a casual farmhouse feel and natural elements with a splash of modern elegance, Farmhouse Chic ambiance should be right up your alley. 

Dining room table and patio

Renewing the Farmhouse Chic Look

Some designers are wondering whether Farmhouse Chic is falling out of style. True, we’re all slightly over the “Live, Laugh, Love” signs and black-and-white buffalo check. However, other basics are enduring beautifully. Let’s look at which Farmhouse Chic features are wearing out their welcome, which ones are still in, and how to breathe new life into the look. 

Living on Borrowed Time:

Still Timeless:

Refreshing the Trend:

Farmhouse Chic, Room by Room

Like other interior decors, Farmhouse Chic grants you full permission to personalize the aesthetic based on your taste. Which components you want to keep rustic and which more contemporary are up to you. Let’s look at some examples. 

white farmhouse living room

In Your Living Room

Often the largest room in the house, the living room is an excellent place to mix authentically distressed wood (i.e., furniture or mantel) with contemporary pieces for visual depth. Ditch the slipcovers and opt for a velvet sofa with modern lines and an accent chair in a rich, warm shade. Wood coffee tables are still classic, but try sleek or painted rather than rough. Mix and match cozy throw pillows in solids and soft prints, skipping the buffalo plaid. Vintage rugs are still having a moment, so feel free to seize it or opt for a simple pattern instead. Resist the urge to pile up collections of rustic trinkets. Living plants always add life to a space by bringing the outdoors in, and landscapes — especially vintage ones — make great art for the walls of an updated Farmhouse Chic living room. 

farmhouse chic kitchen

In Your Kitchen

Light oak cabinets and open shelving add breathing room to a Farmhouse Chic kitchen. Exposed wood beams draw the eye upward, lending a more spacious feel. To avoid wood overload, skip the butcher block countertops and choose marble or quartz. We’re happy to report that beautiful, classic farmhouse sinks are still in vogue and available in materials like copper and stainless steel. (Double-basin versions add even more functionality.) A glossy tile backsplash and glass light fixtures lend shimmer and contrast to rustic elements like a vintage jug with obvious signs of wear. After all, we’re not going for an overly polished vibe. In the example above, we might swap the cool-hued pillows for a smoky green to add warmth. 

warm wood tones in bedroom

In Your Bedroom

Since faux-distressed wood furniture is trending toward the exit, we’re seeing more finished woods, as in our photo example. Offset dark wood tones with white walls and clean lines for a cozy yet sophisticated Farmhouse Chic bedroom. Elegant touches appear in the accent chairs and antique side tables. A thick striped rug, plush bedding, and long drapes — all in natural materials — bring texture. Lighting is warm and soft. The overall ambiance is soothing and inviting.  

white shiplap bathroom

In Your Bathroom

Although shiplap is beginning to feel a bit cliché, you can refresh the look in several ways: by taking it all the way around the room, installing it three-quarters of the way up a wall, or painting it pale taupe or a deep hue that feels on trend. Consider modern elements like a contemporary vanity in deep navy blue and brushed metal fixtures. A mix of botanical and rustic artwork balances the scene. If there were a freestanding bathtub with claw feet in the room, it would absolutely fit the Farmhouse Chic mood.

Go Get the Look

All interior decor styles evolve. And while the Farmhouse Chic of yesterday may not fit your home today, you can easily drop some accessories, do some painting, and add pieces that feel fresh and relevant. Trust your eye and enjoy this inviting, serene, beautiful aura throughout your home!

Last Updated February 20, 2024

Rustic, Refined Buffalo check? Time to uncheck. Faux distressed furniture? Let’s get real. Even if a few traditional Farmhouse Chic elements are wearing out their welcome, this warm and cozy interior design style is still on the scene in a fresh, modern way.  Where Did Farmhouse Chic Decor Originate? Farmhouse architecture emerged from Germany and […]

First, it was showing horses. Later, it was raising kids. After several decades of deferring her classical art education, Diane Simmons now happily portrays pets, wildlife, and people with colored pencils. She even found a way to keep her new favorite medium from fading.

"Pugs and Pencils"

When Diane returned to creating art, she wasn’t keen on the messy oils she used in college. Fortunately, she stumbled upon a renowned colored pencil artist, Bonny Snowdon, who taught Diane techniques for wielding the precise medium. Now Diane uses photo references and applies her colored pencil skills to create detailed renderings of animals ranging from bunnies to bobcats and poodles to penguins.

Glass for the Win

Diane created “Wolf,” showcased above, during a tutorial by Bonny Snowdon Academy using a photo by Susan Richardson. She framed the piece in Frame Destination’s contemporary Angular Blue Wood Picture Frame P435. Below, her “Descent” drawing of a leopard is displayed in our Silver Picture Frame Nielsen 117A, a classic, gallery-style frame inspired by the Bauhaus movement of the 1900s.

Because colored pencil art can tend to grow pale over time, the right framing glass is key. “I love that Frame Destination offers Tru Vue Conservation Clear Glass (formerly UV Filter ArtGlass 99). It is essential to keep colored pencil [artwork] from fading,” Diane says. 

Cheetah drawing on tree trunk
“Descent,” showcased in our Nielsen Profile 117A.

See More of Diane’s Work

Lions and tigers and bears are all on display at AnimalCreationsByDiane.com, her Facebook page by the same name, and pugsandpencils33 on Instagram. You’ll also discover adorable pets and farm animals and get a peek at her people portraits. See my Q&A below to reveal Diane’s secret for adding interest to shading in her colored pencil art.

white tiger above bed
Diane’s studio mates in the foreground, White Tiger colored pencil drawing on the wall, displayed in Frame Destination
Gallery Style Black Metal Picture Frame 2 in matte black.

Now for Artie’s Eight Q&A with Diane Simmons…

1. What is your background; how did you get started?

I majored in art at UCLA and UCSB in the 1970s but put that on hold when I got involved with riding and showing horses. Everything was put on hold when I got married and started a family. The only art I did during those years was when my kids needed help with a school project! Recently, my daughter was going to buy a custom portrait of her cat on Etsy, and I said, "Let me try to do it." I went to a local art store and purchased some pastels because I needed more time to fill my workspace with all the tools and supplies required for oil paints, my preferred medium at the time. I gradually shifted from pastels to colored pencils. Granted, it's a very slow medium, but very satisfying!

2. What role do you think the artist plays in society?

I believe God put creativity in all of us. As artists, we bring beauty into people's lives.

3. What has been a formative experience or the best advice you’ve received within your career?

The best advice I've received as a colored pencil artist is to trust the process. Sometimes, pictures look like they aren't working, and I am tempted to throw them away. But as I continue to layer the colors, I usually am happy with them.

4. In what ways does your work reflect your personality?

I love animals, people, and color!

5. Creative blocks, do you get them? If so, how do you overcome them?

Since I work from photographs, creative blocks aren’t a problem. The real issue is finding time to do every picture I want to do!

6. What is your most indispensable tool? (Not counting the obvious, like paints, brushes, canvas, camera, etc.)

Kneadable erasers, Tombow erasers, Magic tape, and slice tool.

7. Do you have a new project you are working on, or a new passionate idea?

I am starting to do portraits of people, not just animals. Drawing people was my passion in art school. I've started with my family to get a feel for which colored pencils to use before I offer commissions.

8. What is your favorite color to incorporate into your art?

I love using split complementary colors in shading. It adds more interest than just black.

Diane Simmons image

All artwork and/or photographs used in this post are subject to copyright held by the featured artist.

ARE YOU READY FOR THE SPOTLIGHT? Simply respond to the questionnaire here to apply to be included in an upcoming Artie’s Eight Spotlight.

Last Updated February 13, 2024

First, it was showing horses. Later, it was raising kids. After several decades of deferring her classical art education, Diane Simmons now happily portrays pets, wildlife, and people with colored pencils. She even found a way to keep her new favorite medium from fading. “Pugs and Pencils” When Diane returned to creating art, she wasn’t […]

Exuberant Luxury

The interior design style of Art Deco has been a timeless style for a century now, originating with an appreciation for geometric shapes, lines, color, sumptuous materials, and an unabashed sense of fun. Although most people don’t go full-on Art Deco in their homes today, you can express this maximalist aesthetic in small doses for a fresh, modern take.

Where Did Art Deco Decor Originate?

Art Deco gained popularity in France after a Parisian exhibition titled Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes held in 1925. The style took off in the US during the “Roaring Twenties,” aka the “Jazz Age” or the “Golden Age” — a period of giddy prosperity amid liberating technology like automobiles and in-home radios. It fell out of favor around World War II, resurged in the 1960s, the 1970s (coinciding with the 1974 movie The Great Gatsby), and again in the 1980s (when the TV series Miami Vice flaunted the Art Deco vibe). 

Who Does Art Deco Decor Appeal To?

Those who appreciate the finer things, geometric shapes, symmetry, rich color palettes, and an eclectic look will likely enjoy showcasing Art Deco elements in their home. This style overlaps somewhat with the Glam Decor Style.

art deco dresser

Capturing the Art Deco Spirit

Even though it’s rare to see pure reprisals of the Art Deco era today, its appeal is enduring and you can infuse the movement’s principles into any space. Incorporate some of these iconic elements to create the romance of the Art Deco throughout your home.   

Art Deco Style, Room by Room

Bold or subtle? Light or dark? Color palettes and distinctive patterns will shape the overall look you’re going for. Let’s see how Art Deco can play out in a few essential rooms.

Art deco living room
Art deco living room white and beige

In Your Living Room

Grandiose shines here in the space for hosting and entertaining. Art Deco is known for its rich hues, but soft pastels can rule the room depending on your tastes. A high-end upholstered sofa with channeled tufting —uniquely enhancing any piece — is classic Art Deco. In both photo examples here, brass accents repeat to help bring cohesion to each room. High ceilings and long drapes accentuate the vertical space; architecturally, skyscrapers like the Chrysler Building and Empire State Building were prominent in the Art Deco Age. At least one piece in the room can be a conspicuous conversation starter, like the Siamese cat lamp above. 

art deco kitchen island

In Your Kitchen

Think “showy” for the kitchen and let that ideal guide you. Accentuate a stove hood with metal or gold. Creative cabinet insets allow glassware to become part of the shimmery scene, especially when lighting comes into play. Magnify the shine with black-lacquered bar stools and brass or gold hardware finishes. A neutral palette balances the dazzle in our example. Repeated lines or chevron-patterned hardwoods are another Art Deco touch in the heart of the home. 

art deco green bedroom
art deco light bedroom

In Your Bedroom

A tufted velvet headboard in a saturated shade and neutral bedding sets the Art Deco tone in your nocturnal oasis. Slip out of bed onto a faux fur rug. Art in gilded frames or ornamented wallpaper spice up the walls, while metallic chandeliers, sconces, and floor lamps light up the space with glam. Note the simple take on the classic Art Deco sunburst in the first bedroom. Furniture in the bedroom can be a solid lacquered chest of drawers in a deep, bold color — with gold trim and hardware. Nightstands? Sleek and modern. Abstract artwork softens geometric lines. 

moody bathroom

In Your Bathroom

Going over-the-top Art Deco can be fun in a bathroom, where a smaller space intensifies the ambience. Start with deep color on the walls or embellished wallpaper. In this example, the backlit mirror helps reflect the sparkling gold-tiled wall. A funky metallic chandelier could be another lighting option. Go modern with a wood vanity and streamlined sink, or more classic Art Deco with a marble sink and vanity. Alternatively, you may want to go 180 degrees from this photo, embracing light and bright with cream or pastel walls, glazed subway tiles (stacked rather than staggered for an updated feel), basketweave floor tile, and a pop of bright, geometric wallpaper.  

Go Get the Look

In its heyday, Art Deco was considered futuristic thanks to its streamlined shapes. Now, we tend to view the style as retro, with all the charm and romance that nostalgia brings. Whether you pursue the style fully or with a lighter touch, we encourage you to go forth and create an Art Deco aesthetic that’s all you.

Last Updated January 22, 2024

Exuberant Luxury The interior design style of Art Deco has been a timeless style for a century now, originating with an appreciation for geometric shapes, lines, color, sumptuous materials, and an unabashed sense of fun. Although most people don’t go full-on Art Deco in their homes today, you can express this maximalist aesthetic in small […]

One look at Alan Chimacoff’s photographs and it’s obvious that his architecture career shapes his work. Fascinated by everyday urban landscapes, this Princeton, New Jersey, photographer explores the real and illusory space of the manmade world — revealing humanity’s presence despite the absence of people in his photography. 

Geometric Cohesion

As Alan captures city life through buildings, objects, manufacturing, and urban neglect, one great unifier ties his body of work together: geometric structure. For example, in “Facade Floated” shown above, a sunlit south-facing glass building is reflected in the opposite north-facing glass building. In “Ceiling” below, light plays tricks while solids and voids reverse. The depths of raw steel and the artifacts of weather exposure are revealed in “Steel 9,” also below. Each photograph showcases repeated lines and shapes, creating what Alan would call an "abstracted reality."

"I am interested in the uninteresting and seek the unusual in the ordinary, finding the world around me a visual fascination," Alan says.

The Frame and the Pouch

Alan’s current frame of choice is our Nielsen Metal Frame Profile 117 in bright white. He framed “Ceiling” in this particular frame for an exhibition at Soho Photo Gallery in New York City. “Everything I have ever purchased from Frame Destination comes hermetically sealed, with almost never a speck of dust,” Alan says. He’s also a fan of the GalleryPouch™, our heavy-duty, reusable art protector: “I have re-packed a show in an hour that would have taken a day, thanks to this amazing invention!”

"Ceiling" framed in Nielsen Profile 117
“Ceiling,” framed in our slender metal Nielsen Profile 117.
"Steel 9" imprints from manufacturing process
“Steel 9” reveals imprints from the manufacturing process.

See More of Alan’s Work

Explore the galleries of Alan’s website, chimacoff.com, to view an artistic contrast of New York and LA (in his Bi-Coastal gallery), the softer side of “hard-hearted” steel (Steel Evocations), and the visual intrigue of fleeting moments (Ephemera). To discover the tools he cherishes the most and what stops him from buying fad gadgets, read my Q&A with Alan below. 

Now for Artie’s Eight Q&A with Alan Chimacoff…

1. What is your background; how did you get started?

At 8 years old, I was fascinated by pictures and cameras. I started a photography club with two friends in fifth grade.

2. How important is it for a photographer to "connect" with their subject?

It varies with the subject, but it is essential that the photographer bring the subject into intense "focus" to reveal it.

3. What has been a formative experience or the best advice you’ve received within your career?

A genius friend in our little photography club helped me understand that there is meaning in pictures beyond what is depicted!

4. In what ways does your work reflect your personality?

I am essentially about visual things — finding the unusual in the usual and normative, the anomalies in the obvious — and I believe my pictures reflect that. 

5. Creative blocks, do you get them? If so, how do you overcome them?

Yes, I get them. The only ways I have discovered to overcome them is to work, work, work my way through the block and to look for unfamiliar subjects to photograph.

6. What is your most indispensable tool? (Not counting the obvious, like paints, brushes, canvas, camera, etc.)

My eyeballs. And Photoshop Elements!

7. Do you have a new project you are working on, or a new passionate idea?

The goal of depicting space continues to consume me — the actual space between things, and the imaginary space that exists “phenomenally” in two-dimensional images.

8. What "fad" gadget do you most regret purchasing?

I am inherently a cheapskate. So, lucky me, I don't buy fad gadgets. I’ve certainly made some stupid purchases, but they weren't fad gadgets. Some were expensive, and I hope I learned lessons from the stupidity.

Alan Chimacoff

All artwork and/or photographs used in this post are subject to copyright held by the featured artist.

ARE YOU READY FOR THE SPOTLIGHT? Simply respond to the questionnaire here to apply to be included in an upcoming Artie’s Eight Spotlight.

Last Updated January 15, 2024

One look at Alan Chimacoff’s photographs and it’s obvious that his architecture career shapes his work. Fascinated by everyday urban landscapes, this Princeton, New Jersey, photographer explores the real and illusory space of the manmade world — revealing humanity’s presence despite the absence of people in his photography.  Geometric Cohesion As Alan captures city life […]